Any book would someone recommend for manufacturing engineer?

Forums Academic discussion Manufacturing Any book would someone recommend for manufacturing engineer?

This topic contains 14 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by  Vedant Agrawal 2 months, 3 weeks ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • #2952

    Huimin Ou
    Participant

    Are there any books or handbook that are useful for an entry-level manufacturing engineer?

    What concepts do you think an entry-level manufacturing engineer should review before the start date of their job?

    #2957

    Felix Nguyen
    Participant

    This is an interesting topic. I would love to hear any possible suggestions too.

    #2972

    Dhananjay Prahladka
    Participant

    Hi Huimin,

    I do not know if this book technically falls under Manufacturing Engineering, but it is definitely a great book for ISyE students and has several topics covered that a manufacturing engineer could use. The book is called The Goal, and is written by Eliyahu M. Goldratt. It is an easy read, explaining different scenarios in a non intimidating, non technical format.

    #3255

    A standard general, reference textbook which is  frequently used in oil & gas and machinery industry is given below:
    <h5 class=”a-spacing-none”><span id=”productTitle” class=”a-size-extra-large”>Manufacturing Engineering & Technology (7th Edition) – </span><b>ISBN-10:</b> 0133128741</h5>
    However please note that whether or not you will find this book helpful (or interesting) highly depends on which industry you’re working in. With that said, if your interest is in specific subjects such as composites and/or plastics, Additive Manufacturing or manufacturing processes specialized in supper-alloy applications you will find above reference rather shallow. Let me know if you have interest in a specific subject or industry and I will try to re-craft my response accordingly. Good luck!

     

     

    #3260

    Dillinger James
    Participant

    A good reference book is Lean Production For Competitive Advantage. It gives a good overview of KPIs, and lean concepts that can really be applied in any business – especially manufacturing.

     

    https://www.amazon.com/Lean-Production-Competitive-Advantage-Comprehensive/dp/1439820961/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1517897696&sr=8-3&keywords=lean+production&dpID=511g9U3leQL&preST=_SY291_BO1,204,203,200_QL40_&dpSrc=srch

    #3261

    Mohammed Ali
    Participant

    I would recommend to read “Fundamentals of Manufacturing, by Philip D Rufe,CMfgE” this is a great book with 8 chapters covering all you need to have a solid foundation for manufacturing.

    With reading and understanding this book you can go for the “Certified Manufacturing Engineering certification offered by the SME. this is one of the most recognized certification in US. for more information on that visit the http://www.sme.org

    #3265

    Richard Ohrt
    Participant

    Reply to Huimin Ou of #2952:

    I would recommend any of the lean fundamental books.  From the core reference material for Lean Bronze Certification through SME:

    As others have stated, the best books really depends on the industry that you will be a manufacturing engineer in; the above are key for production line type positions.  These books are fairly easy reads and expose you to a lot of the terms used frequently in manufacturing.

     

    #3272

    Catherine Hartnek
    Participant

    I am also super curious about this topic. I did a quick Google search to see what comes up, but hard to say if any of the books that come up are worth it without spending a lot of time diving into reviews.

    Richard- I have had people recommend “Learning to See.” I will definitely check that one out.

    #3475

    Sarah Brennan
    Participant

    The Toyota Way is a great book for lean manufacturing, it goes through the history of the auto industry and analyzes how Toyota became so dominant in the market. After I read that I certainly looked at the production line I work on differently and worked to find process improvements to create a lean production line.

    #3484

    Lizzy Svigelj
    Participant

    I second the recommendation of “The Goal” by Eliyahu Goldratt. There are lots of great principles that are taught about manufacturing and lean, but in a story format.

    As far as handbooks, the Memory Jogger 2 is a great little booklet with tools that can be used for Kaizen or Six Sigma events.

    #3522

    Maximilian
    Participant

    I would recommend most books on the Toyota Production System and its impact on the automobile manufacturing. This book is very interesting and complemented my visit to Toyota’s commemorative museum of industry and technology.

    https://www.amazon.com/Management-Lessons-Taiichi-Ohno-Production/dp/0071849734/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1524518325&sr=8-4&keywords=taiichi+ohno

    #3535

    Zihao Li
    Participant

    My recommendation for the textbook would be

    Toyota production system  (An Integrated Approach to just in time)

     

     

    #3651

    wenhao
    Participant

    Agree with Lizzy,  “The Goal” by Eliyahu Goldratt is a wonderful book and its plot on a real story line to demonstrate the principle of manufacturing world.

    #3667

    Zach DeGroote
    Participant

    Reply to Huimin Ou of #2952: Reply to Huimin Ou of #2952:

    I am taking ISyE 641 this semester, which deals with Quick Response Manufacturing and the textbook “Quick Response Manufacturing: A Companywide Approach to Reducing Lead Times” by Rajan Suri is really well-written.  If you are interested in applying lead time reduction principles at your job, I would definitely recommend it.

    https://www.amazon.com/Quick-Response-Manufacturing-Companywide-Approach/dp/1563272016

     

    #4685

    Vedant Agrawal
    Participant

    As everyone said above, “The Goal” by Eliyahu Goldratt is a great book that discusses manufacturing process management and the 3 basic goals of a manufacturing company. I was also recommended ‘Quick-Response Manufacturing’ by Rajan Suri, who was actually a professor at UW Madison a few years back, and also the founding director of the QRM center on campus.

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