Kaizen Events

Forums Academic discussion Manufacturing Kaizen Events

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  • #7046
    Vaikunth
    Participant

    How would I recognize when a Kaizen event is necessary and when it might be overkill or even not worth the effort for marginal benefits? Are there tools I could use to check that or would I have to rely on the experience of my manager and in time, my own?

    #7110
    William Wirono
    Participant

    In my opinion, the best way to know if a company requires a Kaizen event is whether the process is living up to its potential. In other words, there might be a possibility for the company to work and achieve better productivity but they have not realized it yet. I think it all comes down to experience, and working and observing there regularly.

    #7520
    Ryan Cody
    Participant

    I think the best Kaizen events are the ones unofficially made by the operators themselves. If you incentivize kaizen, they naturally may come up with the best ideas for improvement. Just an idea.

    #7570
    Deepak
    Participant

    Through my experience, I would like to share both the overwhelming success and initial struggle an organization has faced by organizing these events. The Management started “Kaizen events” with a target time frame of half-yearly where everyone in the organization right from the top-level management to the shop floor people was encouraged to identify and work towards the improvement of already established processes through a team activity. Initially, people were hesitant thinking these events might be one-off and didn’t participate in the event due to their own daily schedule. But few people who were new to the organization were upbeat about the opportunity provided to them and started identifying improvement projects. The first Kaizen event involved only 2-3 teams, but the management decided to continue the event understanding its benefits and organized a factory level gathering in the shop floor where all levels of employees were invited to attend. The Management displayed the results of the first Kaizen event which the participated teams were able to achieve. This initiative of quantifying the results made everyone believe that these improvement projects do help in improving the already established processes. This visual representation / quantifying the result gave all employees a sense of involvement and encouraged them to work towards continuous improvement projects. The second kaizen event saw an increased number of team turnout working on Kaizen projects. The department-level managers started encouraging their department members to form teams and work on projects apart from their daily scheduled work.

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