Grant Matthew Smith

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  • #8037 Reply
    Grant Matthew Smith
    Participant

    Like everyone else has said, it’s totally up to you. If you love something specific in ISyE like Operations Research or Health Systems Engineering, by all means consider a Masters because they allow you to get more specific with your education. If not, look for jobs and learn a little bit more about what you like. There is always the option that a company will help pay for your Masters program after working there for a couple years – definitely worth noting.

    #8036 Reply
    Grant Matthew Smith
    Participant

    Hey Rucha, I may be a little late on this one, but I’m a senior at UW in ISYE. I’m currently interning in supply chain at a large company and will be starting as a full time SC Analyst in May 2021. Unfortunately, there’s not really any great ISYE courses that deal with supply chain that run every semester or even every year. There are OTM classes in the business school but they don’t really appreciate engineering joining business classes and destroying the curve for all the business students (lol). Anyways, I’d say it’s quite easy to switch to Supply Chain even though you only have experience in manufacturing, especially if you’re already inside a company. I’ve noticed that large corporations have no problem with lateral movements between somewhat similar departments like SC and Ops/manufacturing.

    #8035 Reply
    Grant Matthew Smith
    Participant

    There are plenty of certificates that will be relatively easy to get while still graduating in four years – My only advice (as a senior in ISYE) is that you shouldn’t get a certificate because it “looks good” to employers…get one because it’s something you’re interested in! It turned out that I didn’t have space in my schedule to get a certificate but that didn’t stop me from taking classes like Environmental Economics (343) that I would’ve taken if I pursued a Sustainability Certificate. Employers really don’t care about your certificates. Do it for yourself, not them.

    #8034 Reply
    Grant Matthew Smith
    Participant

    I chose to become an ISyE major my sophomore year of college. I started as an aerospace engineer, but decided that I would be better off in the business world (Ops/Supply Chain). ISyE was a great way for engineers to learn how to think critically in a business environment and manage/plan small projects.

    #8033 Reply
    Grant Matthew Smith
    Participant

    I’m also working in Supply Chain. At first, I did a lot of Continuous Improvement work within my department like process mapping functions to discover what contributed to certain internal lead times. Now I’m moving towards managing small projects like creating Tableau servers for my division.

    #8032 Reply
    Grant Matthew Smith
    Participant

    This is a great question – hopefully I can provide some insight. I’m a UW student in ISYE (senior) and am interning in Supply Chain at a large US Defense contractor. I’m coming on as a full time SC Analyst when I graduate. Data is super important to Supply Chain at my company because it gives us metric that we can use to monitor our performance and see where we can improve. I worked a lot with data at work recently, but I’m no data scientist. We have data analysts in Supply Chain, and if you want a job like that (where you’re pulling data, creating reports, analyzing performance, and sometimes working on improvement projects) then a Data Science major would greatly benefit you. On the other hand, I’m just a Supply Chain Analyst, meaning I mostly work on implementing those improvement projects for our Supply Chain. It’s a better job if you’re looking to get into managing and directing parts of a company. While I work with data sometimes, I would not need those specific data science classes – I can do everything I need with good Excel skills and Tableau.

    Hope this helps!

    #8031 Reply
    Grant Matthew Smith
    Participant

    Very interesting question! I think of writing code as writing an book report (but for STEM people like us). Of course you can google people’s opinions on books and find how others used certain quotes to make their point (don’t plagiarize!) but you aren’t really learning if you do that. The best way to learn Computer Science is to really really grind out those long nights of coding and debugging. It takes a lot of effort and time, but it is the only way to make you think like a Computer Scientist.

    #8030 Reply
    Grant Matthew Smith
    Participant

    It’s really cool to see UW-Madison’s ISYE program contending with some of the best engineering schools in the country. As an ISYE student at Madison myself, I can tell you that the program offers a wide variety of classes with some incredible professors.

    #8029 Reply
    Grant Matthew Smith
    Participant

    I’m a senior ISyE student and will be working as a Supply Chain Analyst when I graduate in May. UW doesn’t offer a ton of Supply Chain emphasized classes within ISYE (there are OTM classes for business students) but I’m taking ISYE 641 next semester which will have a unit on modern supply chains!

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